[MozFest]Playful & Participatory learning at Mozilla Clubs

Mozilla Festival has been one of the the biggest Open web events that I’ve ever attended. For the folks who’ve already been a part of Mozfest know that it’s 3 days of sheer madness(the good kind, obviously) and AWESOMENESS! MozFest is an annual celebration of the world’s most valuable public resource: the open Web.

Volunteer with Mozilla and join hundreds of others who are defending the Internet: http://mzl.la/1sGMI7K

Posted by Mozilla on Thursday, November 12, 2015

This year, a lot has happened to me so far. Although I was geared up for the madness, as Murphy’s Law suggests, everything that can go wrong will go wrong( and it did)! Mozfest has this amazing ability to connect people with people and people with their interests. It is also that time of the year when you get to meet other Mozillians and community members from all over the world. Putting a face to that name(IRC nick) is always wonderful!

This year at Mozfest, I was invited by the Mozilla Learning Network. As a regional coordinator for Mozilla clubs, something that’s on top of my priority list is to empower club captains and make sure I cater to their needs, in terms of resources, support and whatever I can offer them to run a Mozilla Club. Something that I focused on at Mozfest this year was Participation and help define “Teach like Mozilla”.

K, cool. So what did you do to help?

I ran a fireside  chat called Playful and participatory learning in Mozilla Clubs at Mozfest. Oh, and we had real FIRE and WOOD as well!
Here’s a walkaroud tour of our space:

Thank god we had superman!

Damn. That sounds fun! What’s it like?

We had an amazing set of audience attending the session from a very diverse background. The session was focused on story telling, sharing experience and best practices from learners, teachers, educators and developers.


 In some parts of the world like Finland, there’s not much motivation required for people to learn about Web literacy, while in other parts like Brazil, people are more interested in gaming and unless you make it really interesting for them, people won’t  join any web literacy event.
  • Hacking vs Remixing
    Parents are scared on what their kids do online. Even when it’s about web literacy, they think coding or remixing is hacking.
  • Not restricted to kids but adults as well
    Web literacy is not only for kids but adults as well. People of all ages need to know how to read, write and participate on the web.
  • Kids vs Parents
    Parents tend to get scared when their kids know more about technology than them. But parents are also interested in learning from their kids and then kids are also excited to teach their parents something they know. In short, if kids are past your level, learn from them.
What are some fun, participatory ways in which you’ve learned or taught stuff?
In India, there were examples of people who taught to code through games like hopscotch and HTML web page frameworks using bricks. Mostly focused on Lo-Fi and No-Fi teaching kits. Movies are really a big thing in India. Remixing movie posters on thimble is the all time fav activity.
In Spain, there are night school programs in companies where the parents, who are employees of the company, come along with their kids and learn about technology. There are different levels of stuff being taught to kids and parents and at the end of the session, kids show their parents some cool stuff they’ve created.
In Brazil, people are taught to remix web pages of popular gaming website and add their names so that they can show it off to others.
In the US, teachers taught with examples of aliens. They are encouraged to create for the WEB and not for any individual. This , personally for me, meant a lot on the digital inclusiveness front. There were examples of colour blind people, left handed people etc.
ore informal session where kids teach..
In Korea, programming is regarded sacred. They have a 6-8 week of curriculum to recruit non computing people and make those students good programmers. There is a selection process for the same and it depends on ideas that people have, and how technology could help them shape their ideas. Students from this program has been hired by companies like Google, MS etc.
Quotable quotes from the session:
Switching roles-as a teacher, shift my focus on the process and not on result. What education means to me is we can live together.. Relationships we’re building together..
I get scared when my kids know more about technology than I do.
 Kids are excited to teach parents what they know. Be open to the idea of learning from kids.

Feedback for MLN:

  • Better ways of recognizing learners? Is there something that can show all the skills that I’ve learnt at my Mozilla club.
  • What happened to open badges?
  • Ability to share thimble and other makes without having to login. Kids don’t have email ids.

If you’ve attended the session and would like to add to this, please write to me at dun3buggi3[at]gmail[dot]com or tweet to me @dun3buggi3
IMGUR Gallery of images from the session: http://imgur.com/a/u0P94

#MozLove to everyone who has attended the session.

Mozilla Learning at Darbar college

I’ve done a lot of events for Mozilla. Infact, I’ve lost count of the number of places I’ve spoken at. Most of these event requests come from college students/ school authorities. However, I was delighted to see an email from Mr.Praveen, an Assistant Professor in the Departmen of Computer Science at Smt. Kumudben Darbar College of Commerce, Science and Management Studies, Vijayapura (Karnataka State). It was interesting because of the fact that a teacher is interested in organizing a Mozilla event in their college for the students. We took the discussion forward and I got to know that he had read my previous blogpost on “How to organize an event“.
Little secret: I love it when people get in touch with me after doing a thorough study about whatever it is rather than messaging me- “bro, i wanna contribute to Mozzilla!Halp” He told me that he’s interested in organizing an event and asked me how we could take it forward. Things went on quite quickly and he had put up a team of student organizers for the event. I started from Bangalore at night and got there in at around 7 AM in the morning(9 hours from Bangalore). I was welcomed by Mehriz and his friend, both students of Darbar college. They took me to the hotel and we were discussing a lot of things on our way. Mehriz is an aspiring writer who wrote his first book called “HardwareNAMA”, inspired from the very famous Akbarnama . At around 10 AM Mr.Praveen, along with the students, came to pick me and go for the event. We met the principal Mr.Grampurohith. DSC_4745
It was indeed an eye opening discussion with him on why the Karnataka state government just focuses on Bangalore and not any other city, for that matter. Be it technology, startups, education- everything is concentrated into one city. Bangalore is a very competitive and fast moving place. A student from a small city like Bijapur from a small college, who migrates to Bangalore after completing his/her education, would find it hard to get a job. Competition from students in Bangalore+students outside Bangalore who come here for work.
He told me to stay in touch with the college post my session and also thanked me for taking the effort to travel and come to their college for the event.
DSC_4765We soon started off with a good crowd of around 70 students, although midway, we had more students coming in and unfortunately had to restrict some due to seating capacity of the hall. DSC_4760
The slide used for the presentation is attached below.

Kudos to the team of organizers for putting up such a great event with good logistics.
DSC03546Some of the insights from interacting with the students are as follows:

          • Everyone is interested in Technology
          • Knowledge they have is more theoretical
          • Minimum exposure to events
          • Barriers to contribute


Following up post event on the press report and future plan for the college. We had talked to the principal on generating more interest from people by conducting activities and sessions. The most exciting part of this conversation was to create a curriculum to integrate opensource and Web literacy in the educational curriculum. This serves as a beta test. If this works in Darbar college, we could replicate the model in the entire university level.
The students were really friendly and they came up to me and offered to take me around the city. It was a beautiful place with lots of amazing things to see. One wouldn’t find so many culturally and historically important things in a city like Bangalore. It’s always fun to explore the city with the locals, especially since I love hearing stories, rumors and facts.

As I was leaving Bijapur to Bangalore. I met a co passenger who asked me why I was a visitor(considering the fact that I was speaking in english to people who came to see me off). I told him everything about Mozilla and what I do and he was really impressed and said that he will contribute to Mozilla. I was a happy man!

Updates: We’re having a call on the 10th of September about integrating Web literacy  Curriculum into the college syllabus. Do let us know if you have ideas and thoughts on this.
Full set of photos on Flickr here.
Mozilla Reps portal event page: https://reps.mozilla.org/e/mozilla-learning-at-bijapur/

Press Report in Kannada Newspapers:


Mozilla Learning Networks

As I was writing my previous blogpost and checking out images from the Whistler Work week, I came across this one:
Mozilla learning Networks
I thought to add this in my previous post, but then I figured this is more important and needs a blogpost for itself.
If you’re reading this, you probably know that there’s been a lot going on with Mozilla Webmaker. Mozilla Webmaker previously acted as an important entry point to Mozilla contribution. The Webmaker project aimed at imparting Web literacy and education in a very hands on and participatory way. But the vision for this was is really huge! Like SUPER HUGE(in terms of Potential and Impact)!

This very much relates to Mark Surman’s blogpost on Mozilla Academy.

“Okay, cool! So what’s all this about? What is the end goal?”

All efforts of the Mozilla Learning Networks team funnels into the end goal of Universal Web Literacy.

So let’s dig deeper into the Mozilla Learning by splitting this into 3:

  1. Networks
  2. Groups
  3. Convening


Hive is an example of a Learning Network. It’s a constellation of communities around the globe that are championing digital skills and web literacy through connected learning.
It’s a peer to peer professional development network.
It catalyzes innovation through:

  • Curriculum
  • Practices
  • Projects
  • Collaboration
  • Funding

2. Groups:

A Mozilla Club is an example of a group. A Mozilla Club meets in person regularly to learn how to Read, Write and Participate on the Web through informal participatory activities & peer to peer mentorship. Interested in running a club? Sign up here.

We activate Regional Coordinators to recruit and support Club captains to successfully run their clubs.

3. Convenings:

There’s no explanation required here to say that Mozilla Festival is the biggest convening of educators, makers, hackers and technology enthusiasts. Mozilla Festival this year is from the 6th-8th of November.
It’s a platform and opportunity to network. It’s a converging of network leaders motivating educators to become regional leaders.

Maker Party(July 15-31,2015):
Maker Party serves learning by connecting with Mozilla Learning Network. Working with clubs by conducting learning events to identify and promote leadership and spreading Universal Web Literacy.

Interested in learning more about Mozilla Learning? Follow the wiki and watch the video below:

Firefox Clubs and Mozilla Clubs

Last month, the Mozilla Learning Networks team met at the Work Week in Whistler. Lots of things were discussed and I was fortunate enough to be a part of most of them. I, as a Regional Coordinator for Mozilla Clubs, have been conducting various calls with potential club captains to provide more understanding on the direction we’re heading to. It was announced that Maker Party is taking a new turn and how it is different from the previous year(https://blog.webmaker.org/maker-party-2015-the-evolution-of-a-year-long-party). India is a country that has one of the largest Mozilla Communities in the entire world. We’re also proud to have an equally large number of Firefox Student Ambassadors. I would say that the FSA program is one of the pillars of Mozilla since I started contributing to Mozilla as an FSA. It has a wonderful structure that is fast adapting with the ever growing number of contributors, thanks to TJ her team of executive board members+RAL’s. From various discussions that we had in India with FSA’s who were contributing to the Webmaker project, we got to know that they had a lot of questions. Here are some of the questions that they had in mind:

  • What are Mozilla Clubs?
  • How is it different from Firefox Clubs?
  • Does this mean that we are splitting Firefox Clubs according to products/projects? Ex. Webmaker, Firefox OS, Localization etc. has their own clubs?
  • Is Webmaker all about the app now?
  • What’s new with Maker Party this year?

We had a detailed discussion regarding this and we would like to provide more clarity on each of these questions that FSA’s have in mind.

What are Mozilla Clubs? A Mozilla Club is a group of learners who together meet regularly to learn how to read, write and participate on the Web in a participatory way by making projects they care about, supported by a shared set of curricula. Mozilla Clubs is a program to teach digital skills and web literacy. It focuses on regular, in-person learning tailored to the needs and opportunities of local communities. It harnesses the Web as a unique public resource to learn and grow.

How is it different from FSA Clubs? 20150626_133158 Mozilla Clubs are focused on spreading the mission of *Universal Web Literacy. Unlike FSA clubs, they are not restricted to students. Essentially, students who are a part of Firefox Clubs are already Web literate. They could start individual clubs in their regional communities or help mentor a regional community to start/facilitate/run a Mozilla Club that benefits learners who want to learn these skills. Mozilla Clubs could be started by anyone who has the time, commitment, enthusiasm and dedication to help teach the web. He/she could be a student, a teacher, a software engineer, a freelancer – basically anyone who has the willingness and passion to start and sustain a club.

Does this mean that we are splitting Firefox Clubs according to products/projects? Ex. Webmaker, Firefox OS, Localization etc. has their own club?

Let’s take an example. As a Firefox club, you might be conducting one event every week. Week 1: Web Literacy Week 2: Firefox OS Week 3: Localization Week 4: Bug fixing We do not ask you to set up a separate Mozilla Club, but utilize your Web Literacy week to teach Web skills(Refer Web literacy Map) to people who lack that. For this, you could either use the resources and curriculum given by Mozilla or create your own ones for the community to use. Apart from this, you could also incorporate the framework of reading, writing and participating across other events as well. Example:You could help articulate how Localization and bug fixing are “participation” and important as open practices. This is also the same with like minded organizations. An existing organization might be having resources and conducting meetups to teach the web. They could associate with Mozilla in order to reach a wider audience. Mozilla Clubs does not aim to strip the identity of an organization or a group. We aim to provide a structure and resources to an existing club so that they could benefit from the same.

TL:DR: A Mozilla Club is a package consisting of structure and resources that help to teach the web. You are free to use it under the name of a Mozilla Club or any other identity. It’s the end goal of teaching people how to read, write and participate on the Web that matters.

Is Webmaker all about the app now?

Previously, we used Webmaker to refer to the tools, content and community. Moving forward, though, Webmaker is a reference to the new app, where teaching content and community of those that want to teach web literacy skills fit within the Mozilla Learning initiatives.

Mozilla Learning has the Webmaker app that helps people have their first hands on experience at creating the web with ease using a mobile phone. Please bear in mind that mobile app is still in Beta, available currently on Android phones, and new features would soon be available, including the ability to access it on desktop. You can read more about the plans for the Webmaker app, as well as X-Ray Goggles and Thimble here.

TL;DR: Thimble is being improved, X Ray Goggles will continue to exist and the Webmaker app is added. Popcornmaker and Appmaker won’t be available in their current form, however, the LEGO like building functionality will always remain to be the core behind new tools.

What’s new with Maker Party this year?

If you’ve seen the info graphics last year, India played a crucial role last year which is pretty evident from the number of Maker Party events conducted. We’ve spent a huge amount of resource,money and hours in doing events all around the world. It was amazing to see the number of people who’ve attended these events. However, these events were one time events. This year, we aim to empower regional level participation and learning communities. This means that although the campaign is for 2 weeks, we would be conducting learning/teaching events throughout the year. It’s not a one time event with huge number of learning stations but a year long event with the focus on regional level activities.This blogpost would help you understand how Maker Party might spark longer-term engagement through Clubs:https://blog.webmaker.org/maker-party-is-right-around-the-corner-july-15-july-31 Feel free to write to me or anyone else in the MLN team if you’re an FSA and you have more questions relating to FSA and Mozilla Clubs.

*Universal Web Literacy

Webmaker at Dayananda Sagar College of Engineering

Having reached Bangalore on 30th (March) morning from Kannur, I must say that sleep was something that I yearned. But no! The mind and body wanted two different things, so the body finally compromised with coffee. Got to the office at around 10:30 am to notice that there was no one inside. Opened it myself and started working on the slides for the event(yes, just few hours before the event because that’s the way I roll). As I was preparing the slides, I dropped a text asking Sagar and Sam (the super hero event organizers) what time I should be starting  from my office. I also had another Mozillian co-speaker, Shivika, who was supposed to reach on the venue since she was co-presenting. Status check with her and I figured that she already boarded the train.

The traffic sure decided to mess things but having taken their advice, I was wise enough to leave early just to reach there by 1:30 PM. Sagar accompanied me inside the venue and showed me around the college. Felt good to be back to college(like a real college COLLEGE). Little later, Shivika had arrived and we soon started off with the sessions.

Event poster
Kicking off with an introduction Mozilla, the manifesto and why we volunteer for Mozilla. This was followed by an interactive spectrogram(Hell yeah, because I love doing that).
Protip: Post lunch sessions are difficult for students. They tend to fall asleep even if the topic if really interesting and it’s upto the speaker to capture their interest.
Disclaimer: I can go to any extent to prevent you from falling asleep during a session that’s scheduled post lunch.

Talking about why I contribute to Mozilla and specifically to the Webmaker project was something that I loved doing(and hope the students liked it too, atleast they pretended to have :D). I contribute to Webmaker to #Teachtheweb because I believe that not everyone has the “luxury” to know how the web works. I believe this should be considered as a necessity, and not Luxury! Create more clubs in regions in your reach. Let the movement spread across the city, country and world. Empower regional leaders and create an impact which is evident to the educators, who in turn shape the curriculum for the future. Push them to feel that Web literacy should be a part of the educational curriculum in the country.

If you’re looking to read more about the event in detail, I’d save myself the pains of taking it from deep inside my highly unorganized memory(that’s what happens when you blog 3 months post the event date) and link you to two awesome blogposts.

  • Shivika, my co-speaker, blogged about her experience of the event. You can read it here.
  • Sam, one of the organizers wrote about the event here.

Photo with my co speaker and the event organizers

#MozLove to the wonderful organizers Sagar & Sam for the hospitality at DSCE and to Shivika for giving that wonderful talk on WoMoz, challenges faced by women in tech and how to contribute to Mozilla.


“Hi, I’d like to organize an event.”

It’s been a long while since I’ve last written a blog. Although not mandatory, I make it a point to blog my events whenever I can. I’ve got some amazing feedback from the community about how much some of my posts have helped them conduct events. Being a community builder, nothing made me more happier than this. People actually DO read my blog posts even though they are very big! Recently, I’ve been at the Portland Work week. I was a part of the Reps and the Community Building tracks. I met many amazing people from all over the world, interacted with them, brainstormed with them and got to learn about a lot of things. I had planned to use them all for an event recently and try some beta activities and starters. Although I very rarely make presentations for events, I did prepare one for this one. But yes, Murphy had his liking on me at that time and things that could go wrong, went wrong. But I must agree that I had the support of my mentors and the community members, without which, things would’ve been a lot tougher. I’ve been told that this never happened in any of the communities before. Or maybe it did and was not brought to anyone’s attention. Nevertheless, I decided to blog about this since this could be a learning experience for the community as a whole. They always say, we learn from our mistakes. I did too! A LOT! So this is a guideline I wrote. If you’re planning an event and want me to come over,  I would suggest you follow these. DISCLAIMER: The views and guidelines expressed in this post are that of my own and not of the community. Feel free to re blog this if you want. If you would like to refine this and add to this or want to pick on this, feel free to shoot me a mail. EVENT ORGANIZER: Who is an event organizer: An event organizer is generally a Mozillian/FSA who contacts an FSA/REP for a Mozilla event. This person is generally a point of contact in that area (which may comprise of a geologically, linguistically, or culturally different place). What the speaker or facilitator generally expects out of you: When the event organizer gets in touch with an FSA/REP/Mozillian me for an event, he/she I generally expect some basic things.

  • Make sure the date of the event is confirmed. Especially if the speaker or facilitator requires traveling and staying at that place.
  • Give an estimated number of attendees or participants for the event so that he/she could prepare accordingly. It’s NOT THE SAME when there’s an event for 20 people and for 100 people.
  • Make sure all the permissions for the venue are got in prior(preferably in writing) to confirmation with the speaker so that there won’t be any last minute hassles.
  • Mozilla events REQUIRE internet! Do not assume that since he/she didn’t specifically mention Internet, so they don’t require it. In some cases, the speaker might do necessary arrangements, however, it’s always best to re-check.
  • ALWAYS have a back up! The internet could always malfunction especially when there are many people connected to it. Make sure you have a plan. The cable to connect the projector might be different so prepare your laptop just in case.
  • Make sure that you tell the participants or attendees what the event is about so that they have an idea what to expect. A speaker or facilitator is more like your class teacher. He/she prefers 5-10 interested students rather than 100-120 people who are least interested. It’s not the crowd that matters, it’s the interest.
  • Confirm the arrival and departure details of the Speaker or facilitator very well in advance and ask him/her if any assistance is required on accommodation and travel options. It is more likely that you know the best routes, venues and hotels in your place.
  • If you are busy, MAKE SURE that you arrange some responsible people with the logistics, accommodation and travel. We all know that for a big event, it’s tough to manage everything on your own and things might go wrong, which is very understandable. It is always advised to have some helping hands to reduce your work burden and move things smoothly.
  • Do not panic when things go wrong. The speakers or facilitators who are coming for your event have conducted various events and know very well that things could go wrong. They do understand that and it’s always a good idea to ask for help rather than “hiding” things from them.

SPEAKER/FACILITATOR: Who is a Speaker/facilitator? This is generally an FSA/Mozillian/Mozilla Rep who has been invited as a domain expert to talk about something particularly in Mozilla or to introduce Mozilla and build a community. What is expected out of the Speaker/Facilitator:

  • Be prepared on what you’re going to talk about. Yes, we know you might be a fan of Joker and not Batman, but sometimes planning has it’s own perks.
  • Make sure you don’t run your session over time. People don’t like it! Always make sure your timings are such that you get time to cover what is required. In universities and schools, make sure that you schedule your session such that the students don’t miss their break times.
  • If you’re running a workshop, make sure that you deal with people at different paces. Be all over the place whenever required. It’s good to ask the event organizers or volunteers to help out people who are stuck.
  • Make sure you get in touch with the event organizers and confirm the event dates, venue and estimated number of attendees well in advance. This should also be done before booking the tickets if travel is required.
  • It is always advisable to think of a backup plan just in case things go wrong. If there is any other friend or acquaintance from the place, do get in touch and inform them too. This could be done even if the event organizer has a good track record of organizing events before.
  • If you’re going to a place where you don’t know the language they speak,the Internet is your friend. Do research about the place you’re going to, so that you know what to do, where to go and what to eat. Wikitravel and Tripadvisor are good websites for this. Also,if you’re on Couchsurfing.com, do check out verified people from the area for help around the city and AirBnB for staying.
  • Share your preferred medium of contact with all the participants so that they could get in touch whenever required.
  • If you’re not sure or don’t know something, feel free to admit it!

Common Goals for both: Pre-event: It’s a good idea to keep track of the metrics of the event before the planning. This helps analyze the required resources for the event and helps plan the event with less resources and more output. Post event: The success metrics of any event in general is defined by the number of contributors after an event and how we can sustain them. The approach differs from event to event but is always best discussed so that the organizer can think of ways in which there could be a follow up on the participants interested in contributing. Okay, So I just realized this was a huge post and you’ve survived till the end. So here’s something for you :)

[Day 2] Maker party Chennai

Maker party Chennai!
Finally, the much awaited day has come! It was the 14th of September.
Woke up with all tiredness from the previous day to see that we were late. Thank God we had the bike with us! Home to venue-30 minutes..Vroom Vroom!
As I entered, I saw something that really caught my attention. The Maker party Chennai banner.

I rushed to the venue just to make sure things were all set. I was really happy to see all the volunteers busy working to set the stalls,stations, lights, sound system. Having seen the venue one day before, honestly I had no idea that it would be like this on the day of the event. Kudos to the amazing job done by the volunteers.
Although many stations started by 10:30 am, everything was fully functional from 11 am.
You could find the list of stations here:
The first station was the Chain Reaction and Magic tricks station. We had Himanshu and his super awesome volunteers who were running this station.
This station welcomed people with a card trick and a chain reaction that was triggered by user input and it would print the name of the person.
Here is a video of how it went:

There were a lot of people who were fascinated by the Chain Reaction and many more who were pestering him to know the card trick. So we’re an Open community and we don’t keep any secrets! Himanshu was kind enough to tell people some of the tricks and even taught them some small tricks.
The Appmaker station was handled by Vishwaprasath and Nikhil.

This station had a large number of students who were interested in making apps and were super interested to hear more about Firefox OS and have a demo of the devices. Most of them were using Firefox OS for the first time and were pretty impressed by the Intex device which is on sale for just Rs.1999 in the Indian market.
Within sometime, we had the mini drones up in the air.
Drones never fail to amaze me.
Thanks to Srinath for making this possible.
Here is a video of these in action.

Moving around, I could see a really large crowd at one of the stations called Vibrant Hue, by Greema.

It was the Art station at Makerparty Chennai. Greema was kind enough to join us at the event in teaching people the basics of Art. Yes, art is not something that could be taught since it’s a skill. But this is skill sharing.
Here is a video of an amazing art by Greema.

People loved to get their hands dirty to make something amazing!

She also gave out many amazing works that were done on the spot. What more could one ask for

Aand the kids loved it!

Do check out more amazing art works at the Makerparty Chennai on Greema’s Official Facebook page:
Vibrant Hue art station at Makerparty Chennai
Another station that was crowded always was the 3D printing station by Redd Robotics.
Being a really new and upcoming concept, there were many people who came for the event to see what 3D printing was all about and they were all amazed! Thanks to Redd Robotics- our Hive partners at Mozilla India, for being a part of Makerparty Chennai.
We then had Prakash from Simple Labs with a demo of some really interesting devices and their applications which amazed me! What amazed me more than what I’ve seen is what I’ve heard of Prakash mostly because of Induino.
Check out this website if you’d like to know more about Induino: http://www.induino.com
So Makerparty and webmaker is all about teaching the web. The web is a really big place which could be unsafe. To tell us about staying safe on the internet and about Computer and network security, we had the super awesome Null community with us at the Makerparty. Thanks to Chintu for being the link to Null :)
Also, if you’re interested to know what written on his tee, it’s -HACKER, in Hindi :D
Loved their little posters as well.
Here is the website if you wanna read more about Null Chennai:http://null.co.in/chennai
To tell us more about Open education, we had a Wikimedia station run by Mr.Pavanaja from CIS Bangalore.
The Wikipedia station was really informative and there were lots of people interested in getting to know how they could contribute to making the world’s largest public resource even better.
One of the most interesting stations at the Makerparty Chennai was the Game Design station by Arun, Varun and Cerlyn. We’ve always loved to play games. But ever wondered how a game is made? Or How ideas turn into designs and designs to animations?
There was a really good control flow in this station. Cerlyn talked about Game Design to the people. Once they’re done with that, the participants move on to Arun, who told them about Game Art. He puts your ideas into actual digital drawing.
They are then directed to Varun, who taught them Game programming. It was wonderful to see them explain all these in a detailed manner along with the small posters in the station.
Although it was late, we got a confirmation from Atmel. Atmel Corporation is a worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of microcontrollers, capacitive touch solutions, advanced logic, mixed-signal, nonvolatile memory and radio frequency (RF) components.
They brought with them a lot of devices which actually showed us how our modern touch screen phones actually work.
Sincere thanks to Anu for being a part of Makerparty and bringing Atmel.
We’ve been hearing a lot about Augmented Reality since a while now. And we decided, we need AR right here at Makerparty Chennai. And voila!! We had a station for that as well!
DIY electronics calls out to the name BRIX! And yes, we had them too.
We also had individual makers who displayed a lot of stuff.
Arun Magesh, for instance, had something called as the MindBot!

Yes, it is as cool as it sounds. Doing cool things just my reading your brain waves!? Sounds impossible? We saw it live at Makerparty Chennai.

There were a number of people who wanted to try this on and see how it feels like to be able to control using your mind.

And we had a team from SRM university who came up with a Humanoid robot! I did have a few minutes to interact with the Robot who was too busy playing football. Just when he had some rest, I decided to click a picture.
So just when you think that you’ve seen it all, we had the GDG station! Yes! Google Developer Group-Chennai, one of the most active tech communities in Chennai.
What did they have to show!?
We had demo of Android wear, the smart watch!
A station on App Inventor: beta.appinventor.mit.edu and many more super awesome Google tehnologies.
OH! Wait! Did I just forget to tell you about the Google Cardboard
..and the Google Glass we had!?

Apart from stations, we even had talks on the “Version control using Git” by Jeyanthan and “Computer Security” by Null.

With around 700 attendees, this is one of the biggest MakerParty in India in the Makerparty period.

Finally, Group pics! :D
Press coverage:
Times of India-Chennai throws it’s first MakerParty
Netizens meet over coffee, share steaming hot ideas

Event photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/116230719@N08/sets/72157647619592691/